biology, Developmental biology, genetic modification, medicine, Science

Genetically engineered human embryos have arrived

Well, it was only a matter of time. All the major news outlets are reporting the breakthrough of a research team that managed to use CRISPR/Cas9 to edit human embryos that carried a mutation which causes cardiac hypertrophy (MYBPC3) – a thickening of the heart muscle that is the leading cause of death in young atheletes. Continue reading

Biological therapy, biology, genetic modification, medicine, News, Science, science news

A successful first for gene therapy

Who would like to hear some really good news? Thought so. One of the promises of the molecular biology and genomics revolutions was that gene therapy – replacing defective, disease-causing genes with functioning ones, or otherwise treating these diseases by genetic means – would become a reality. Even, optimistically, something commonplace. Like so many things, however, it has proved more complicated than hoped, and those longed-for treatments elusive. There has never been a therapy of any kind that alters the disease progress of a neurodegenerative disease – until now. Continue reading

biology, medicine, Science

Health inequalities persist into the genomic age

Back in my childhood when I first got into science fiction, I read all those classics, from early romantic science fiction like Jules Verne into the “golden age” of Asimov, Clarke and beyond. Ah, all those wonderful dreams of perfect societies, robots and spaceships! Except that the overwhelming majority of those perfect societies bore a striking resemblance to a certain ideal of 1950s America, where women were love interests/to be rescued/in the kitchen and people of colour were…er, nowhere to be seen, actually.  Now that we’re in the timeline of the future that a lot of those books imagined, it’s refreshing that the science fiction is a lot more reflective of the wide variety of human experience that exists. I’d like to say that societies have progressed along with the technology, and, very unevenly, they have. A bit. And yet somehow it’s still really disappointing to me when I read something about personalised medicine, and that something is: it’s heavily biased towards white people.  Continue reading

biology, medicine, News, science news

New antibiotics could be right under – or in – our noses

There is increasing concern over the rise in antibiotic resistance, with many infections now becoming resistant not just to commonly used, long-established antibiotics like penicillin, but to last-resort newer antibiotics like vancomycin. The search for new antibiotics is becoming increasingly urgent – and it seems that some are lurking in surprising places. Continue reading

biology, Explainer, medicine, News, Opinion piece

Zika virus: from mice to monkeys, via organoids

There’s been a rush of new papers out lately which are starting to explain how Zika virus causes fetal damage. Understandably, since the suspicion of a link between Zika and microcephaly (an abnormally small head, associated with neurological defects) in humans was raised, there’s been an intensive research effort directed at uncovering the causality of this process, but I’m still impressed at the speed at which scientists are gaining answers. It was only last month, after all, that the CDC declared that there was a “causal link” between Zika and microcephaly. Continue reading

biology, cancer, Explainer, medicine, Uncategorized

The future of cancer treatment, part 1

Following on from my post on the new treatment for ALL, I thought I’d go into cancer in general a bit more. In this first part of a double post, I’ll briefly go into what cancer is and the principles of the main types of current treatments. In the second part, I’ll consider some of the more futuristic cancer treatments that are starting to enter the mainstream.

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