biology, medicine, Science

Health inequalities persist into the genomic age

Back in my childhood when I first got into science fiction, I read all those classics, from early romantic science fiction like Jules Verne into the “golden age” of Asimov, Clarke and beyond. Ah, all those wonderful dreams of perfect societies, robots and spaceships! Except that the overwhelming majority of those perfect societies bore a striking resemblance to a certain ideal of 1950s America, where women were love interests/to be rescued/in the kitchen and people of colour were…er, nowhere to be seen, actually.  Now that we’re in the timeline of the future that a lot of those books imagined, it’s refreshing that the science fiction is a lot more reflective of the wide variety of human experience that exists. I’d like to say that societies have progressed along with the technology, and, very unevenly, they have. A bit. And yet somehow it’s still really disappointing to me when I read something about personalised medicine, and that something is: it’s heavily biased towards white people.  Continue reading

biology, Developmental biology, evolution, Science

Meanings in a song: Australian finches tell their chicks about the world outside the egg

I had one of those “I never knew that,” moments reading a paper in Science magazine this week, but, given that the research in question managed to get published in one of the top journals in the field, neither did lots of other people. The “that” in question? That sounds can alter the development of a embryonic bird to enable it to adapt to the environment it can expect when it hatches. Continue reading